January 30, 2014
seeingjasonssegel:

Karl. 

seeingjasonssegel:

Karl. 

January 23, 2014

stoneofthehapless:

Middle-Earth in Outerra

Middle-earth as it would appear from space. 

January 23, 2014

willambelli:

ha. 

WILLAM

January 20, 2014
themarvelageofcomics:

The Avengers by Fred Hembeck

themarvelageofcomics:

The Avengers by Fred Hembeck

December 28, 2013
faglips:

"opulence! you own everything! everything is yours!"

faglips:

"opulence! you own everything! everything is yours!"

December 27, 2013
"In terms of the companions all being ‘the same’ — that’s not as phony or artistically crap a thing to say as it sounds. What is the base group of people who would run away with the Doctor? They’re all going to be a bit mad. A bit dislocated. Not happy with where they are. Are they yearning for outer space? They’re going to be people who feel like they can take on the Doctor, who’s quite an intimidating sort of person. So, they’re going to be feisty — they’re going to be all those things. He sort of defines the people who are going to travel with him. The distinction comes very much from the various actors and actresses. So, you know, they’re the ones who create the differences between them."

Steven Moffat on companions

(via doctorwho)

“Rose is open, honest, heartfelt, to the point of being selfish, wonderfully selfish. Martha is clever, calm, but rarely says what she’s really thinking. Donna is blunt, precise, unfiltered, but with a big heart beneath all the banter. But we come back to what I was saying ages ago about turning characters. If Rose can be selfish, then her finest moments will come when she’s selfless. If Martha keeps quiet, then her moments of revelation - like her goodbye to the Doctor in Last of the Time Lords, or stuck with Milo and Cheen in Gridlock - make her fly. Donna is magnificently self-centred - not selfish, but she pivots everything around herself, as we all do — so when she opens up and hears the Ood song, or begs for Caecilius’ family to be saved, then she’s wonderful.”

- Russell T. Davies on companions

(via forrome)

I think those two quotes showcase the attitudes of the two writers to Doctor Who. Moffat thinks it’s all about the Doctor and everything revolves around him, whereas Davies thinks that the people who travel with him have their own lives and matter in their own right. And the way he wrote always made clear there was a world outside the Tardis doors that wasn’t just waiting to be saved or looked at. Torchwood, the Shadow Proclamation, Sarah Jane Smith - all those institutions and people were examples of how the Doctor was just one decent (and flawed) hero in a universe full of heroes. That’s missing in Moffat’s Who.

(via itsonlyanobject)

(via thegeekagenda)

December 27, 2013
http://itsonlyanobject.tumblr.com/post/71248096483/manicpixiedeathbitch-in-re-watching-the-nine

manicpixiedeathbitch:

In re-watching the Nine and Ten era Doctor Who series, one thing that has really stood out to me is the emphasis on questioning inherent power structures. Nine actively and literally tells people to question things (see the Satellite 5 episodes) - question your…

(via thegeekagenda)

December 23, 2013
twitterthecomic:


"all i want for christmas is true love" shut up fcuker you want a video game and Ted on bluray
— mistletoe monty (@weepysweetmonty)
December 25, 2012

twitterthecomic:

December 19, 2013
stoneofthehapless:

The Dragon Helm of Dor-lómin; art by Eric Fraser

stoneofthehapless:

The Dragon Helm of Dor-lómin; art by Eric Fraser

(Source: mirrkwood)

December 3, 2013
stoneofthehapless:

The rising of the Moon by ~Marya Filatova

“Now rumour came to the camp in Hithlum of the march of Fingolfin and those that followed him, who had crossed the Grinding Ice; and all the world lay then in wonder at the coming of the Moon. But as the host of Fingolfin marched into Mithrim the Sun rose flaming in the West; and Fingolfin unfurled his blue and silver banners, and blew his horns, and flowers sprang beneath his marching feet, and the ages of the stars were ended.” 

— J.R.R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion, “Of the Return of the Noldor”

stoneofthehapless:

The rising of the Moon by ~Marya Filatova

“Now rumour came to the camp in Hithlum of the march of Fingolfin and those that followed him, who had crossed the Grinding Ice; and all the world lay then in wonder at the coming of the Moon. But as the host of Fingolfin marched into Mithrim the Sun rose flaming in the West; and Fingolfin unfurled his blue and silver banners, and blew his horns, and flowers sprang beneath his marching feet, and the ages of the stars were ended.” 

— J.R.R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion, “Of the Return of the Noldor”

(via tolkienianos)

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